Monday, 30 April 2012

Binding Components in SOA 11g


Binding components establish the connection between a SOA composite application and the external world. There are two types of binding components:
Services:- Provide the outside world with an entry point to the SOA composite application. The WSDL file of the service advertises its capabilities to external applications. These capabilities are used for contacting the SOA composite application components. The binding connectivity of the service describes the protocols that can communicate with the service (for example, SOAP/HTTP or a JCA adapter).
References:-Enable messages to be sent from the SOA composite application to external services in the outside world.
Binding components enable you to integrate the following types of technologies with SOA composite applications:
(i)Web services:- This service enables you to integrate with a standards-based web service using SOAP over HTTP. Web services are described in the WSDL file. The Create Web Service dialog also enables you to configure support for WS-Coordination and WS-Atomic (WS-AT) transactions. WS-AT provides transaction interoperability between Oracle WebLogic Server and other vendors' transaction services  or external transaction processing systems, such as Websphere, JBoss, Microsoft .NET, and so on.
Property used to describe the WS-Atomic Transaction fields:-
Transaction Participation:-Select a value. If you added the web service to the Exposed Services swim lane, this action enables external transaction managers to coordinate resources hosted on Oracle WebLogic Server over WS-AT. If you added the web service to the External References swim lane, this enables Oracle WebLogic Server transactions to coordinate resources hosted in external environments over WS-AT.
(a)Never:- No transaction context is imported (for services) or exported (for references). This is the default value if you add the web service as a service binding component in the Exposed Services swim lane.
(b)Supports:-If a transaction exists, a transaction context is imported (for services) or exported (for references). This information is added to the composite.xml file.
(c)Mandatory:-A transaction context is imported (for services) or exported (for references). This information is added to the composite.xml file. For exports, a web service exception message is thrown if there is no active transaction. For imports, a fault is returned to the client if there is no transaction context in the request.
(d)WSDL Driven:-This property only displays if you add the web service as a reference binding component in the External References swim lane. This is the default value.
Version:- Displays the WS-AT supported version (1.0, 1,1, 1,2, or default). By default, this list is only enabled if you select Supports or Mandatory from the Transaction Participation list.
(ii)HTTP  binding:- The HTTP binding service enables you to integrate SOA composite applications with HTTP binding.
(iii)JCA adapters:- JCA adapters enable you to integrate services and references with the following technologies:
(a)     Databases:- The database adapter enables a BPEL process to communicate with Oracle databases or third-party databases through JDBC.
(b)     File systems:- The file adapter enables a BPEL process or Oracle Mediator to exchange (read and write) files on local file systems. The file contents can be in both XML and non-XML data formats.
(c)      FTP servers:- The FTP adapter enables a BPEL process or Oracle Mediator to exchange (read and write) files on remote file systems through use of the file transfer protocol (FTP). The file contents can be in both XML and non-XML data formats.
(d)     Message systems such as Advanced Queueing (AQ) and Java Messaging Systems (JMS):- The AQ adapter enables you to interact with a single consumer or multiconsumer  queue. Multiple queues can also service a single application, partitioning messages in a variety of ways and providing another level of scalability through load balancing. The JMS adapter enables an Oracle BPEL process or Oracle mediator to interact with a Java Messaging System (JMS). The JMS architecture uses one client interface to many messaging servers. The JMS model has two messaging domains, point-to-point and publish-subscribe. In the point-to-point domain, messages are exchanged through a queue and each message is delivered to only one receiver. In the publish-subscribe model, messages are sent to a topic and can be read by many subscribed clients.

(e)     IBM WebSphere MQ:- The MQ adapter provides message exchange capabilities between BPEL processes and Oracle Mediator and the WebSphere MQ queuing systems. Messaging and Queuing Series (MQ Series) is a set of products and standards developed by IBM. MQ Series provides a queuing infrastructure that provides guaranteed message delivery.


(f)      Oracle Applications Adapter:- The Oracle applications adapter provides connectivity to Oracle Applications. The adapter supports all modules of Oracle Applications in Release 12 and Release 11i.

(g)     TCP/IP sockets:- The socket adapter enables you to create a client or a server socket, and establish a connection. This adapter enables you to model standard or nonstandard protocols for communication over TCP/IP sockets.


(h)     Third-party adapters (SAP, PeopleSoft, and others):- The third party adapter enables you to integrate third-party adapters such as PeopleSoft, SAP, and others into a SOA composite application.

(iv) Oracle Business Activity Monitoring (BAM):- The Oracle BAM adapter enables you to integrate Java EE applications with Oracle BAM Server to send data.
(v) Oracle B2B:- The Oracle B2B service enables you to browse B2B metadata in the MDS repository and select document definitions.
(vi) ADF-BC services:- The ADF-BC service enables you to integrate Oracle Application Development Framework (ADF) applications using service data objects (SDOs) with SOA composite applications.
(vii) EJB services:- The EJB service enables Enterprise JavaBeans and SOA composite applications to interact by passing service data object (SDO) parameters (uses a WSDL file to define the interface) or Java interfaces (does not use a WSDL file to define the interface).
(viii) Direct binding services:- The direct binding service uses the Direct Binding Invocation API to invoke a SOA composite application in the inbound direction and exchange messages over a remote method invocation (RMI). You can also invoke an Oracle Service Bus (OSB) flow or another SOA composite application in the outbound direction.

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